Pump Sales Direct Blog

  • The technology fire-fighters use to tackle a blaze

    For better or worse, the tragedy of the fire at Grenfell Tower has put a spotlight on the response of emergency services. As you’d expect, no other service attracted more scrutiny than the fire and rescue service. All of Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn and the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan were quick to praise their heroic efforts, but what exactly allowed fire-fighters to save the lives of so many? The technological developments of the last few years certainly played their part; the arsenal of today's firefighter goes way beyond a mere end suction pump...

    Drones 

    end suction pump Drone in action during a forest fire

    Asking what a drone actually is can provoke a variety of answers. Browsing Wikipedia for a definition of a drone will offer anything from an underwater vehicle to spacecraft. What unites these disparate structures under the branch of drone is the fact that they are all unmanned. And it is exactly this property that gives them such intriguing potential for use in fire and rescue missions.

    A drone, or more specifically an unmanned aerial vehicle, can be used to transmit real time video of the progression of a fire using infra-red imaging - and do it better and far quicker than anything else. Not just limited to reconnaissance, there is a growing hope that, in the future, drones will become a fire-fighting tool in their own right. Incorporating the ability to extinguish fire by sound would alleviate the crippling weight of water that has until now, scuppered the possibility of fire-fighting drones. Watch this space.

    Communications

    When tackling a raging fire, communication is imperative in ensuring resources are allocated as effectively as possible. Paradoxically, the people that are the most important in identifying and relaying the development of a fire and the location of survivors are also the most at-risk and the least well-equipped to do this. Engulfed by smoke and flames, overburdened with heavy equipment, with their field of vision obscured, it is understandably difficult for fire-fighters to converse with the incident commanders that have the say-so to commit or withdraw resources.

    Thankfully though, the evolution of technology has made this communication far more fluid and reliable. Breathing apparatus now has integrated radio communications which use a frequency that has been bolstered to minimise the possibility of any loss of signal.

    end suction pump Siebe Gorman and Co smoke helmet
    Source:http://www.london-fire.gov.uk

    Breathing apparatus 

    We have come a long way from the Lord Buckethead-esque smoke helmets of the late 1800s, and it goes without saying that the breathing apparatus that allows fire-fighters to travel through smoke and fire filled areas unscathed today has dramatically improved. The fire services use either closed circuit breathing apparatus (CCBA) or self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) depending on the gravity of the situation. Regardless, both are flexible and lightweight pieces of equipment that provide the wearer with oxygen in a toxic environment.

    With an abundance of technology at their disposal, you can see why fire and rescue services have become better and better at extinguishing fires over time, and let’s hope this level of progress continues well into the future.

  • From plastic bags to paving stones: innovative solutions to the waste crisis

    Disposing of hundreds of millions of tonnes of waste is no walk in the park - literally. The era of dumping waste in landfill sites is over. With the global population set to rise from 7 billion to 11 billion by 2100, the amount of waste we are producing is only going to rise. It is becoming more and more difficult to properly dispose of waste and the world is finally waking up to this fact - individuals all across the globe are committed to discovering new ways not just to dispose of waste, but to recover its utility completely.

    Battery-eating bacteria

    sewage pump Phone batteries at landfill

    In the modern age, a mobile phone is essentially an extension of the human body. While having almost boundless information at the tips of our fingers at all times is undoubtedly a positive, it also comes at a cost - e-waste is some of the most trying to dispose of. A slew of carcinogenic and toxic substances constitute the make-up of a phone battery and because of this, they pose a particular problem for waste disposal experts. The Belgians turned to smelting and the Germans opted for vacuums. The most successful approach appears to belong to researchers at the University of Edinburgh however. They are using bacteria that have the peculiar ability to precipitate out the precious metals in phone batteries as nanoparticles, allowing lithium, cobalt and nickel can all be extracted from battery waste.

    Vanishing circuit boards

    sewage pump Circuit boards at landfill

    Circuit boards are an indispensable part of all but the most primitive electronic devices. Because of their prevalence, they have been plaguing landfill sites with toxins like lead and mercury. In order to combat this threat, 12 research groups across the globe have made substantial efforts to produce a solution. It was discovered that silicon is water soluble, and subsequently, their research focused on reducing the standard width of these silicon circuit boards from 1 millimetre to just 100 nanometres,  allowing the circuit boards to dissolve in a matter of months.

    From plastic bags to paving stones

    Sewage pump Plastic at landfill

    Cameroon is just one example of a country that is turning one of its major flaws into an asset. Plastic bags and bottles have wrought havoc with the country’s environment - everything from blocked drains to polluted rivers have tormented Cameroonians. One savvy entrepreneur is making headway into ridding the country of this scourge by converting what had previously been plastic waste into paving stones. After the potentially toxic chlorine is removed, the plastic can be melted down and combined with sand to make durable paving stones. Not only are they superior environmentally, they are also considerably cheaper than their cement slab counterparts.

    Wastewater processing

    sewage pump Wastewater processing plant

    Wastewater is being underutilised in treatment plants across the globe. Fortunately, chemical engineers are becoming more and more efficient at extracting phosphorus from wastewater. Phosphorus is instrumental in the development of strong and healthy roots, flowers, seeds and fruit of plants. No longer is a sewage pump carrying just waste, but a multitude of potentially useful substances. Because the likes of phosphorus is diverted from the wastewater using modular activated sludge digesters, it dramatically reduces the energy required to treat the remainder.

  • 4 of the most common shower problems and how to fix them

    A shower is a staple of the daily routine and, more often than not, it provides ten minutes of refuge from an otherwise hectic day. A refreshing, cleansing, process that prepares you to face whatever the day has to throw at you. Therefore, we are understandably annoyed when our shower doesn’t work the way we want it to. To make sure you will be able to restore your shower to proper working order as quickly, and as painlessly, as possible, we have assembled this list of common quick fixes.home booster pump

    Low flow/ low water pressure

    A common culprit for a temporary dip in water pressure is the build-up of limescale on the shower head. In this case, descaling the shower head can restore the normal speed of flow of water in this case. In others, however, a more permanent solution is required. One such solution is to invest in a home booster pump. With an intelligent monitor system that can counteract any loss of water pressure caused by water usage elsewhere in the home, the home booster pump is an adaptable and efficient answer to low flow showers.

    Infrequent bursts of scalding hot water

    Someone, elsewhere in the house, flushes the toilet and the cold water that was being used to temper the hot water of your shower rushes away to fulfil this flush, leaving you with scalding hot water. Ouch. One way of avoiding this painful problem is to install high efficiency toilets. By reducing the amount of cold water that the toilet needs to flush, the shower has enough cold water to temper the hot water even when someone else is using flushing the toilet.

    Blown pressure relief device

    Pressure relief devices have got your best interests at heart, but it never seems like it when they shut down the shower completely. Fashioned to blow when internal pressure becomes too much for the shower to handle, a pressure relief device is designed to stop the whole tank from exploding. It is relatively easy to identify when your pressure relief device has blown.  Normally, apart from the fact that your shower won’t work, your shower will be leaking slightly. PRDs are inexpensive to replace, but first, you have to investigate what caused it to blow. Blockages and restrictions in the shower head and the shower hose are two hypotheses worth investigating.

    Noisy shower

    The sound of the streams of water should only be interrupted by your angelic singing voice, not an overly loud whirring shower that sounds on the verge of collapse. Fortunately, a noisy shower isn’t a terrible problem to have - five minutes of work should suffice. Each unit needs to be properly secured to the wall, and the pipes that provide the water need to be secured with brackets. Once you have checked that the blanking plugs have been inserted into spare inlet fittings inside the unit, the problem should be resolved.

    Of course, because of the complex network of pipes and pumps that serve your shower, there isn’t always just one simple fix.  But, with luck, this guide helps you understand and, more importantly, solve, some of the issues that may have been plaguing your shower.

  • How the human race is defending itself against flooding

    Although it might not feel like it, the UK is widely expected to suffer a drought in incoming months. And whilst it may seem like the worst time to start preparing for a flood, it is arguably the best. Floods are often so damaging because the defences made to combat them are often a case of too little, too late. And, unlike a waterlogged garden, you can’t just use drainage pumps. Through months, and sometimes years of preparation, areas of the world have been able to successfully defend themselves against floods. Here are some of the most interesting cases.

    Flood barrierdrainage pumps

    The Eastern Scheldt storm surge barrier in the Netherlands is the largest of its kind in the world. Designed and constructed in response to the devastating 1953 North Sea Flood that proved fatal for thousands, the Oosterscheldekering (as it is also known) incorporates 4 kilometres sluice-gate-type doors that are only closed during adverse weather conditions. It has been so successful that (as part of the broader Delta Works project) it has been named one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

    Hydroelectric dam

    Whilst the Oosterscheldekering is essentially a flood barrier, the Three Gorges Dam in China also doubles as a hydroelectric dam. Because of its 22 cubic km flood storage capacity, the dam is slated to reduce major downstream flooding as an incidence from one in every ten years to one in every hundred years. Alongside its proficiency as an anti-flood measure, the Three Gorges Dam also provides enough electricity to provide for 3% of the national demand.

    Channel modification

     In order to circumvent the pooling of rivers that causes flooding, the river course can be widened, deepened and straightened, to make the speed of flow of the water faster. Channel modification has been carried out on 25% of all the main rivers in England and Wales. While it is clear that channelisation has helped to reduce the risk of flooding, it can also have negative ecological repercussions - the dredging of the Charlton River in northern Missouri in the US caused the number of species present in the modified areas to fall to 13. In the natural areas of the river, 21 different species remained.

    Managed/ ecological flooding

    Ecological flooding is a more recent approach to combatting flooding. Why would you encourage the very thing you are trying to prevent? The answer is that, whilst you are allowing flooding to occur, you are only allowing it to happen in areas that you specify, which prevents it from happening in the highly areas you do not want it to happen. Aside from - diverted floodwaters away from settlements, managed flooding also aids the animal kingdom. An investigation of the ramifications of managed flooding in south-eastern Australia, found that it promoted the diversity of species present.

    Afforestationdrainage pumps

    Afforestation is potentially the most environmentally friendly anti-flood measure. By introducing more greenery, more rainwater is intercepted and used for photosynthesis and consequently prevented from ever reaching the river. The Mississippi River is one notable example of how this approach has paid dividends. As a counter-measure to the 1993 floods, a programme of afforestation was pursued and it has ultimately helped to reduce flooding by reducing the river discharge.

    With global warming making summers drier but winters wetter, do you think we should be doing more to combat the threat of flooding?

  • From the watermill to the dam: How water has fuelled industry

    Grundfos watermill Watermill

    Despite being used for everything from washing to drinking, there is one use of water you might not be aware of - hydropower. The Ancient Greeks first invented the horizontal-wheeled watermill in 3rd century BC and humans have been harnessing the power of the movement of water ever since. Of course, today, the Grundfos watermill serves the altogether different purpose of increasing water pressure. To chart this evolution, we have put together a list of the most significant hydropower developments.

    Watermill

    Before electricity became widely economically viable, the mechanical action of a mill was necessary in the production of important material goods like flour, paper, textiles and metals. Often intentionally diverted from a river, the movement of incoming water was used to drive the blades of a wheel or turbine, which, in turn, would power the milling, rolling or hammering of the mill. The watermill is the earliest example of water being used to serve an industrial purpose and the use of this technology has become increasingly complex as time has progressed.

    Hushing and hydraulic mining

    From its emergence in the 1st century BC, the mining industry has been reliant on the power of water for their work. The technique of hushing was the first to be used with any sort of regularity. It involved directing streams of water towards gravel to erode the rock and expose the ores beneath.  In the midst of the California Gold Rush in 1853, hydraulic mining emerged as a more profitable technique. Very high pressure jets of water were used to erode hillsides at a rapid rate, and whilst it was effective, it did cause widespread damage to Californian agriculture and the local environment.

    Trompe

    Like the watermill, before the advent of electricity, it was necessary to wield the power of water to compress gas. A trompe is composed of a vertical pipe, a separation chamber and two exit pipes - one for the exit of compressed air and another that allows water to leave. As the water falls down the vertical pipe, it travels through a constriction, where an external port allows air to enter, which then causes bubbles to form in the pipe. As the bubbles travel further down the pipe they become pressurised, and the compressed air rises to the top of the separation chamber where it leaves through a takeoff pipe. Trompes were most commonly used to provide for bloomer furnaces, where the compressed air was used to smelt iron from its oxides.

    Hydroelectric dams

    Itaipu Dam

    Since their creation in 1870 in Cragside, Northumberland, hydroelectric dams have superseded watermills to the extent that watermills are now virtually extinct. The principles are the same and the only notable difference between the two is the end result - the production of electricity rather than mechanical energy. By corralling water into a structure, the potential energy of the water could be used to power a turbine, which, in turn, produced electricity. In 1870, the first hydroelectric dam provided enough energy to keep an arc lamp alight. Today, electricity from, the Itaipu Dam on the Brazil-Paraguay border, produces 104 million megawatt hour (MWh) - enough to meet worldwide power consumption for two whole days.

  • How pumps are being used to save lives

    Water for Life - shower pumpsBy definition, a pump is a device that moves fluids by mechanical action. The form which this mechanism takes is becoming more and more diverse. We are all familiar with central heating pumps and shower pumps, but pumps are increasingly being used to save lives across the globe, thanks to the latest technology. From people suffering from heart problems in the UK, to those struggling with respiratory problems in Malawi, pumps have been able to grant them all a new lease of life.

    Preventing death from waterborne diseases

    In many areas across the world, people do not have access to clean, safe drinking water. Often dependent on a single body of water, residents often have no choice but to consume contaminated water plagued with disease. Inevitably, this leads to countless deaths from diarrhoea, dysentery, typhoid and cholera.

    That is why it is so important that wells are built to provide safe drinking water. Fresh water can be transported up to ground level from hundreds of feet below using submersible pumps, providing residents with water they can consume without risking death.

    Saving those that are too ill to undergo a heart transplant

    A research programme headed by world renowned heart surgeon, Sir Magdi Yacoub, has made huge strides towards saving the lives of those who would otherwise die waiting for heart transplants from cardiomyopathy. Instead, a 3 by 5 inch pump is implanted into the abdomen and attached to the left ventricle. Deputising for the failing left ventricle, the HeartMate 2 allows the heart to continue to pump fresh blood around the body.

    While the heart is bolstered by the pump, the patient is given high doses of heart failure drugs that the diseased heart would not otherwise be able to cope with. Many patients, who were so ill that they were taken off the heart transplant list, were able to make a full recovery thanks to this pump without even having to undergo a transplant.

    Innovations that are saving people in the developing world

    In the developing world, conventional medical technology is invariably too expensive to procure. Fortunately, researchers at world leading universities like Rice and MIT have created viable, cost-effective alternatives for those in developing countries in desperate need of medical assistance.

    Bicycle pump nebuliser

    One such example is the spawn of MIT’s Innovations in International Health; a nebuliser constructed using a bicycle pump. For the unfamiliar, a nebuliser provides emergency relief for patients suffering from respiratory diseases. The bicycle pump replaces the air compressor of the nebuliser, and allows it to run in the absence of electricity, making it a more cost-effective and versatile replacement.

    Fish tank pump CPOP machine

    Another example of innovation at its finest is the fish tank pump that is being used to ensure the survival of premature new-borns in developing countries. Researchers at Rice University have created a functioning Continuous Positive Airway Pressure machine for a tenth of the price - using only a box and a fish tank pump. Trialled in Malawi, the device had an immediate impact, the survival rate of premature babies jumped from 43% to 71%.

  • The most bizarre sources of renewable energy

    Our planet only has so many stores of the natural resources we use every day to power our cars and heat our houses. As the global population has spiralled, the search for sources of energy that are renewable, and subsequently sustainable, has become more and more desperate. Over the course of their research, scientists have discovered some truly bizarre sources of renewable energy - including things as seemingly disparate as sweat, dance floors and chocolate.

    Sweat

    Pretty much all of us take a great deal of effort ensuring we sweat as little as possible. Taking showers and baths, applying deodorant and wearing moisture wicking clothing are just three of many anti-sweat measures we take. But what if I told you that researchers from the University of California have been able to harness sweat as a renewable energy source? Using temporary tattoos containing small sensors (or biobatteries) that strip electrons from the lactate present in sweat, the researchers were able to generate an electric current.

    Before you crank up your central heating pump to get a sweat on so you can watch the latest episode of Coronation Street on the TV, this research is at an admittedly primitive stage.  At the moment, sweat can only generate around 4 watts of electric current - enough to power a light bulb for the best part of 3 minutes. Whilst there is obviously some distance to go before it becomes a viable alternative, it is thought that it could have use in biomedical and military research that involves exercise regimes.

    Dance floors

    The kinetic energy produced by the movement of the human body is a significant source of energy. One perceptive and forward-thinking business in Rotterdam installed the first energy generating dance floor in the world. Combining the obvious propensity people have for dancing on a dance floor, Energy Floors were able to power the accompanying LED lights by converting the kinetic energy of the dancers into electricity.

    Energy Floors favour an electromechanical system that transfers small vertical movements into a rotating movement that drives a generator. Do you think these dance floors have any chance of catching on in clubs across the world?

    Chocolate

    Using chocolate for anything other than eating seems like a crime. Don’t worry though; researchers from the University of Birmingham have uncovered a way to produce energy from the waste products of chocolate. Hydrogen was produced by feeding nougat and caramel waste to E. coli bacteria. By combining the hydrogen with oxygen in a fuel cell, electricity was generated.

    Unlike sweat, chocolate seems to have more of a future as a renewable energy source. Researchers at the University of Warwick were also able to power a Formula 3 car capable of taking corners at 125mph using chocolate as a biofuel. Maybe you should hang on to all those left over Easter eggs?

    As you have seen, there are an abundance of unorthodox sources of renewable energy that most of us would never have thought worth even looking into in the first place. Fortunately, researchers had the vision and foresight to do so, and we now have an array of renewable energy sources, one of which may become one of the most important resources on the planet in the future.

    Which source of renewable energy surprised you the most?

  • The History of Hygiene

    Today, we almost take our instant access to steaming jets of hot water at the flick of a switch for granted. Many of us forget the technological advances that have occurred over the past millennia that have morphed and evolved into the likes of the Stuart Turner showermate that we have today. Some of our ancestors braved waterfalls whilst others went months or even years without washing at all. Of course, bathing practices varied wildly across the planet as social and cultural factors dictated. To enlighten you on how human washing habits have changed over the years, we have put together this quick history of hygiene.

    Ancient Egypt

    The Ancient Egyptians were known to have used a substance called natron for bathing. A kind of naturally occurring soda ash that, when combined with oil, made a primitive version of soap. Besides using natron regularly, esteemed members of Ancient Egyptian society had their servants pour jugs of cold water over them in order to maintain a sense of cleanliness.

    Ancient Rome 

    Stuart Turner showermate Ancient Roman bathhouse in Bath

    The Ancient Romans are famous for the aqueducts they instituted across their lands to supply the bathhouses that were a feature of every city. It was commonplace for Romans to attend the bathhouses not only to wash, but also to socialise. Thermae, large imperial bath complexes, and balneae, their smaller-scale equivalents, generally contained a caldarium (hot bath) a tepidarium (warm heated room) and a frigidarium (cold bath) as well as a gymnasium, a library and areas to eat and drink. Although soap was still strictly a luxury good for the Romans, it was common for men to apply oils to their bodies before bathing.

    The Middle Ages

    During the late Middle Ages, hygiene declined as a priority for society for a number of reasons. Public bathhouses became rife with prostitution, and consequently became seen as a place of sin and a place to be avoided. The rise of linen clothing, which was easier to wash than their woolen predecessors, made it easier for people to wash only their face, hands and neck to retain an illusion of cleanliness. Laundry rather than bathing became a weekly routine as perceived cleanliness was supposed to reflect not only the soul of an individual, but also their social status.

    18th and 19th century

    1767 saw the first patent for a shower by William Feetham from Ludgate Hill in London. Although the earliest showers required a hand pump for use, they were more popular than baths because the servants had less water to carry away. In the mid-nineteenth century the increased prevalence of indoor plumbing and the mass production of soap made washing far easier and far more regular.

    20th century

    Tank-less water heaters developed during the 20th century and they became popular for their ability to provide an instant supply of hot water. By the time the 1990s rolled around, 62% of all households in the UK had a shower and there was the choice between an electric shower, a mixer shower and a power shower.

    Today

    Today, 86% of all households in the UK have a shower, and we are fortunate enough to have access to whatever pressure and temperature we desire.

  • A look at some of the world’s most spectacular water features!

    Whether it's a simple garden feature, or a state-of-the-art focal point of a room; water features have been used by architects across the globe to decorate and embellish the architecture of some of the most important cities in the world. Such is the ferocity and complexity of the jets of water that you can’t help but wonder what kind of booster pump they use? Regardless, it is impossible to deny the sheer spectacle of the following water features.

    Banpo Moonlight Rainbow Fountain (Seoul, South Korea) 

    booster pump Banpo Bridge

    The Moonlight Rainbow Fountain in Seoul, South Korea, connects the Seocho and Yongsan districts and is not only a thing of beauty, but also a marvel of efficient engineering. The water that shoots out of the world’s longest bridge fountain is recycled directly from the River Han itself and the 10,000 lights that illuminate the water are energy-efficient LED nozzles. Music, lights and water all synergise to perform a several shows a day, with the day and night shows having distinct sequences.

    Trevi Fountain - (Rome, Italy)

    The oldest and most famous water feature on the list; the Trevi Fountain in Rome was built in 1762. With the backdrop of the Palazzo Poli, the Trevi Fountain plays host to sculptures of mythological Greek gods and creatures as well as the papal crest. As the largest Baroque fountain in the world, it attracts millions of visitors every year. According to ritual, throwing a coin with your right hand over your left shoulder will ensure you return to Rome in the future. It is estimated that €3000 are thrown into the fountain every day and the coins are collected to prevent theft and support the poor people of Rome.

    Swarovski Crystal Head Fountain (Innsbruck, Austria)

    The Swarovski Crystal Head Fountain in Innsbruck, Austria, conceals the entrance to the Crystal Worlds theme park. The way the structure is embedded into the surrounding hills makes it seem as through the crystal head is emerging from the green landscape itself.  The water spilling out from the head’s mouth only serves to further make the crystal head seem as though it is a living, breathing thing.

    Friendship of Peoples Fountain (Moscow, Russia) 

    booster pump Friendship of Peoples Fountain

    Located in the Exhibition of Achievements of National Economy in Moscow (VDNKh), the Friendship of Peoples fountain is the centrepiece of the entire park. Dressed in national attire, the sixteen golden sculptures of women that surround and look out from the central fountain are symbolic of the republics that made up the Soviet Union as of the fountain’s construction in 1952.

    Crown Fountain (Chicago, USA) 

    The brainchild of Catalan artist Jaume Plensa, the Crown Fountain incorporates two facing 50 feet tall glass brick towers separated by a black granite reflecting pool. The towers display the faces of Chicago residents and the spout of water is designed to appear to be falling from their mouths. The dichotomy between the faces on the facing towers is supposed to be a representation of the diversity of the ethnicity and age of people in Chicago.

    Which fountain is on your bucket list to visit?

  • How major sports teams are leading the energy-saving revolution

    Sports teams have some of the highest energy bills in the world. With upwards of 80,000 fans attending each game, vast amounts of energy have to be harvested in order to accommodate for it all. Thousands and thousands of air miles are clocked up every year by fans and players alike. Food, drinks, and toilets cater for fans, while groundskeepers, in conjunction with an array of machinery and fertilisers, work tirelessly to provide a supreme surface for play. Somewhere amongst all that energy consumption, there must be some room for streamlining, right? Thankfully, these teams are taking steps to remedy this.

    shutterstock_136818503 Allianz Arena

    Bayern Munich - Allianz Arena 

    Metal halide fixtures have traditionally dominated the lighting of major sports stadiums, but LED lighting is slowly but surely turning the tide. Without needing 30 minutes to warm up to full brightness and with far greater energy efficiency, LEDs are saving time and thousands of kilowatts of energy. Bayern Munich has teamed up with electronics giant Phillips to launch an expansive layer of lights that completely covers the outer shell of the Allianz Arena. Energy efficient LED lights result in a 60% energy saving, and 38000 of them combine to form the impressive outer membrane which is capable of reproducing an astonishing 16 million colours.

    San Francisco 49ers - Levi’s Stadium

    The first NFL stadium to achieve the LEED Gold status for new construction, the 49ers’ Levi’s Stadium has a tremendous capability for energy-saving. One such innovation is a geothermal hot water pump that absorbs the energy generated by the sun drenched ground that surrounds the stadium and uses it generate a supply of hot water. Testament to the success of the stadium is the fact that they are able to recycle a startlingly high 85% of their water.

    Melbourne Storm, Melbourne Rebels, Melbourne Victory and Melbourne City - Melbourne Rectangular Stadium

    The Melbourne Rectangular Stadium is certainly the most visually striking piece of architecture on the list. Home to four Melbourne teams across football and rugby, the unique geodesic design allows light to filter through to the pitch whilst covering the spectators. In a similar fashion to the Allianz Arena, the Melbourne Rectangular Stadium is also kitted out with thousands of LED lights on its exterior, giving it the ability to perform ‘light shows.’ Prominent artists have worked with stadium engineers to create specific sequences for different events.

    Forest Green Rovers - New Lawn

    While we appear to be slacking when it comes to energy saving compared to our neighbours across the pond, some teams are still taking a stand. Conference Premier side Forest Green Rovers became the first in the UK to play on an organic football pitch. They believe the higher cost of organic materials is off-set by the savings made from the long-term benefits to the soil. Not content with just that illustrious title, the club has also installed 170 photovoltaic panels and a solar-powered autonomous lawnmower.

    From harnessing solar energy to maximum effect to making use of more efficient lighting fixtures, it is obvious that many sports teams are keen to be more energy efficient. Often blamed for their excessive waste of energy, it is pleasing to see sports teams taking steps to rectify this issue.

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