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Submersible Pumps

  • Maintaining a swimming pool this Summer

    As June 1st is rapidly approaching that can only mean one thing… summer! If you’re fortunate enough to have an outdoor pool now is the time of year to maintain the pool water to ensure it stays clean and safe to swim and splash about in.

    Our pool maintenance tips aren’t just for those with a pool in their homes, they also apply to spas, hotels and local swimming baths; however we know for these types of commercial locations it is paramount to always be on top of the cleanliness for public use.

    5 Swimming Pool Maintenance Tips

    Whether it be an indoor or outdoor pool there is always going to be a certain amount of debris that will gather at the bottom of the swimming pool. It’s important that every few days this is cleaned well to remove any rubbish that is laying on the base; depending on the amount of use it could be worthwhile doing this daily to make sure there isn’t a huge build up, especially if it is a public pool.

    Keeping the pool water clean is one of the most important parts of pool maintenance and this all comes down to how the pump is running. There are a variety of swimming pool pumps available that will keep a clean flow of water in the swimming pool but depending on the size and the amount of usage the pool is getting this will be something to consider. Our range of submersible pumps is varied by size and brand, our professional customer service team will be able to help you find exactly what you’re looking for to meet your needs.

    Algae can be a big problem for swimming pools so making sure you clean the tiles around and at the bottom of the pool is a huge priority. This will remove any build up along with minimising future occurrences. The brush you use totally depends on the time of tile/materials used within the pool so be sure to do your research first so you don’t cause any damage to the swimming pools structure.

    7.2 to 7.8 are deemed as the healthiest Ph level for swimming pool water so these are the type of levels you should be looking at having yours at. It’s easy to know what Ph level your pool water it at by using a test kit. This ensures the healthiest and most sufficient water for swimming use.

    Filter cleaning, how often are you doing this? If you’re not sure then that’s probably a sign that it isn’t enough as it should be, however be sure not to over clean as this can also negatively affect the regular process of the filter. A great way to know if your filter needs cleaning is by monitoring the flow between the flow metre and pressure gauge, if there is an increased flow then this is an indication your filter needs cleaning.

    Swim Clean in 2019

    By following these simple steps your swimming pool will clean and more importantly safe to use. For any further information on our swimming pool pumps or for expert advice be sure to get in touch with our expert team.

  • Meet our bestselling pumps

    At Pump Sales Direct, we only stock products we truly value; products that we think our customers will value too. By only stocking pumps our customers have shown a demonstrable interest in, we strive to provide customers with all of their pump requirements. All of our offerings are sourced from the most reputable and best established manufacturers in the world - from Danish-based Grundfos to the German brand ABS. Every product is of the utmost quality, but, partly because of demand, partly because of the product itself, some products are able to separate themselves from the rest. In this post, we want to introduce you to some of our bestsellers and why you should consider purchasing them.

    Salamander CT50 Xtra 1.5 Bar Twin Impeller Regenerative Positive Head Shower Pumpsalamander shower pump 1

    Over the past three decades, Salamander Pumps have slowly but surely cemented their position as one of the best and biggest manufacturers of shower pumps in the UK. Owing to their decision to completely overhaul their product range and revamp it according to feedback from installers and homeowners five years ago, their ascent has accelerated. Their twin impeller regenerative positive head shower pump is amongst our most popular products. Key to the success of any shower pump is how little noise it can emit. As well as being extremely quiet, the Salamander CT50 shower pump is straightforward to fit and very durable, making it everything you could ever ask for from a shower pump.

    Grundfos UPS2 25-80 grundfos ups2 250

    Grundfos is a giant of the pumps industry. Merchandised by distributors in over fifty countries, you can expect to encounter Grundfos’ globe-spanning influence wherever you are in the world. You only get to such a coveted position by putting out products of supreme quality year after year. Grundfos’ UPS2 - 25-80 heating circulator pump is a perfect example of unmatched performance. Rated A, in compliance with EUP energy regulations designed to indicate to consumers a product’s  energy efficiency, this heating circulator from Grundfos will help your home more effectively heat and distribute water throughout your home - making your household more eco-friendly in the process.

    ABS Robusta 200 W/TS manual/automatic submersible pump, 230v submersible pumps

    ABS, a branch of Swiss manufacturing powerhouse Sulzer, produces a range of more than capable submersible pumps. The Robusta 200TS (230V) submersible pump from ABS is a versatile and reliable offering. A light drainage submersible pump, it has proved one of our most bestselling products. Designed for pumping clear water and wastewater, it is an affordable way to keep your house, garden or yard free from flooding. It even has built-in level control and a check valve, just to make sure.

    Here, we have presented three of our best selling products. If you have any questions about any of these products (or anything else for that matter) please do not hesitate to get in touch. You can contact us by phone, email or through our contact form.

  • What are submersible pumps used for?

    submersible pumps ABS Robusta submersible pump

    Submersible pumps are one of our bestsellers at Pump Sales Direct. Their popularity, in some part, derives from their versatility. Equally at home fighting fires (their cables are flame retardant) as they are handling seawater and extracting oil from thousands of feet into the Earth’s surface, submersible pumps have a wide range of uses. And having already brought you a guide explaining the ins-and-outs of how they work just a month ago, we thought it would only be natural to follow it up with a post explaining the different scenarios in which they can be used. To learn about the ways in which submersible pumps are used and why, carry on reading.

    Irrigation

    Supplying crops with water is as important a job as any - one that, in many cases, falls to submersible pumps. The future health of our food depends on the efforts of submersible pumps. Tasked with moving masses of water from one location to another, often with metronomic precision, submersible pumps certainly have an important and difficult undertaking on their hands. There are two forms of submersible pumps, or rather compositions of submersible pumps that are typically used for irrigation - deep-well submersible pumps and vertical turbine pumps. The major difference between the two is the location of the motor. In vertical turbine pumps, the motor is installed above ground and connects to the pump itself via a line shaft. Deep-well submersible pumps have a slightly more intricate and complex design - their motor accompanies them submerged in the water - and is designed accordingly to cope with the high pressure.

    Drainage and wastewater

    Multi-stage submersible pumps’ ability to pump water upwards against the action of gravity makes them a popular choice in the sewage and wastewater industries. In packaged pump stations, where drainage by gravity is not possible, submersible pumps have become particularly invaluable - so much so that they can be considered to have had a marked impact on the sewage pumping industry over the last fifty years. Their use isn’t just confined to the commercial world though; they are just as useful domestically. For homeowners with a swimming pool or a pond that needs draining, a quality submersible pump is a valuable ally.

    Oil extraction

    The action of submersible pumps is essentially the same no matter what fluid it is pumping. While minor alterations may be made to account for differences in viscosity, submersible pumps appeal to those in the oil industry for the same reason they appeal to those in the wastewater field - submersible pumps are able to act against gravity. Where the use of submersible pumps with oil differs from those that are designed to handle water, is their ability to endure the variations in viscosity, temperature and depth that oil extraction often demands. Depths of over 4000ft are common and electrical submersible pumping systems are assembled to maximise durability and productivity even at such huge depths.

    As you can see, submersible pumps have a plethora of potential uses - both commercial and domestic - and you will find a range of the highest quality submersible pumps here. If you have any questions about specifications or otherwise, please call or email us, we are happy to help.

  • How do garden water pumps work?

    Garden pumps are an essential component in keeping your garden fresh, green, garden water pumpsand clean. There are different types of pump, namely submersible and external – but the basic premise of how they work is relatively similar. This article aims to give a brief explanation of how garden pumps work and outline their various functions.

    Anatomy

    A submersible garden pump's primary component is its impeller which moves the water through the water intake pipe and the water outlet pipe. The intake pipe is connected to inbuilt filters which clean the water as it passes through before being re-distributed via the outlet pipe.

    The pump is often powered by an electric motor which is why it is essential that a submersible pump is entirely waterproof. The electricity flows through wires in an enclosed block to separate the current from any possible contact with the water – thus ensuring personal safety.

    It is the electric motor which turns the impeller, and the vanes of the impeller discharge the water with each revolution. Due to the impeller's high speed, the flow of water appears continuous. In terms of composition, the garden pump is perhaps one of the most straightforward desgins.

    Submersible or Non-Submersible

    A submersible pump is relatively easy to grasp. The pump is placed beneath the surface of the water, meaning it is suited to gardens where space is at a premium. Submerging the pump creates a more aesthetically pleasing result since there is minimal machinery exposed.

    An exposed non-submersible pump sits to the side of the pond and has a more complex installation process. Before activating the pump, you need to make sure that the pipes contain water to ensure the pump does not begin by sucking air. It is also advisable to have secure housing for your external pump in order to separate it from small children and sunlight.

    Function

    Garden pumps can be utilised in numerous ways. Firstly, they can be used to maintain your garden’s water features, for example, a pond or a fountain. A pump will keep the water circulating around your pond, this keeps the water fresh and helps prevent the build-up of algae. In this regard, a filtration pump is ideal because it aids the oxygenation of the water. Garden pumps are exceptional at keeping water running and preventing stagnation.

    A garden pump can also be used to water the lawn since the installation of a pump allows you to transfer large amounts of water to different areas. This feature can also be used to fill a pool elsewhere in the garden.

    In summary, garden pumps are a beneficial addition to your garden – especially if you are considering creating a water feature or already have one that requires maintenance. Garden pumps come in varied forms and offer a range of possibilities, one is sure to fit your needs, and here at Pump Sales Direct, we have a selection of high-quality garden water pumps. For more information, call us on 0800 008 6405, email customerservices@pumpsalesdirect.co.uk , or use our contact form.

  • Submersible pumps explained

    submersible pumps Grundfos Submersible Borehole Pump

    Used in swimming pools, boreholes and cisterns, submersible pumps have an abundance of underwater utilities, but just how do they operate? To help clarify the inner workings of submersible pumps, and how this makes them suited to a number of different uses, we have put together this guide to everything you need to know about submersible pumps.

    What allows a submersible pumps to operate underwater?

    In other words, what makes submersible pumps submersible? Submersible pumps have hermetic seals to thank for this ability. A hermetic seal is any kind of sealing that excludes the entry, exit and movement of any gas, making a property completely airtight. The motors of submersible pumps are protected by the hermetic seal - giving the pump itself the licence to operate without fear of water infiltrating it, which is so important as the influx of water would cause a short circuit.

    How do submersible pumps work?

    Broken down to its constituent parts, a submersible pump consists of a motor, an impeller and a cable. When a pressure switch is activated, the motor spins a series of impellers and the pump can begin to draw water in. The water is pushed through the pump and travels to the surface, where a pipe then transports water to the desired destination.

    What is the difference between single stage and multiple impeller submersible pumps?

    Single stage impeller submersible pumps are the simplest, and most commonly used variety of submersible pump. As the name suggests, single stage impeller submersible pumps contain only one impeller, giving them limited range and power when compared to a multi-stage impeller pump. You will find single stage impeller pumps in use as swimming pool and pond filters as well as in drainage.

    Meanwhile, any transportation that requires any kind of artificial lift, like a borehole or a well, is reliant on a multi-stage impeller submersible pump. This is because, with multiple stages, they have the strength to propel water upwards against the pull of gravity. While this makes multi-stage impeller pumps more versatile, the increased exertion they are exposed to makes them far more susceptible to damage than their single stage counterparts.

    What are the advantages of submersible pumps?

    By way of their operation underwater, submersible pumps are constantly primed which is an advantage for a number of reasons. Because they are acting against gravity, above ground pumps are subject to huge amounts of stress that submersible pumps simply don’t have to deal with. Also thanks to their positioning deep underwater, they are protected from any potential cavitation issues - placing submersible pumps amongst the most resilient and durable pumps on the market. The typical lifespan of a submersible pump is evidence of this - they typically last well over 25 years.

    Compare submersible pumps at Pump Sales Direct

    Sourced from the leading manufacturers worldwide like Grundfos and Ebara, Pump Sales Direct is proud to make a range of the highest quality and best value submersible pumps available to customers online. If you have any questions or queries, do not hesitate to contact us. You can get in touch on 0800 008 6405 or email customerservices@pumpsalesdirect.co.uk.

  • How does a coolant pump work?

    Think you might need a coolant pump? You’ve come to the right place. By coolant pumpleaning on our years of experience in the pumps industry, we have created this post that will tell you everything you need to know about coolant pumps. For everything from sizing requirements to compatibility with different materials, you’ll find it all here.

    What is a coolant pump?

    As you can probably guess by the name, the role of the coolant pump is to ensure that coolant is distributed evenly throughout the structure in which it is situated. Coolant is any substance (generally speaking a liquid or gas though) that is used to regulate the temperature of a system. In industrial processing, the term ‘heat transfer fluid’ often replaces the term ‘coolant.’ Coolant pumps are used in a range of industries, which has led coolant pumps to specialise in a number of different ways.  Typically though, a coolant pump is a submersible multistage centrifugal pump. Put in simpler terms, a coolant pump is capable of operating fully submerged in liquid, and works by imparting energy from the rotation of multiple shaft-driven impellers to the coolant.

    Secondly, it is important to differentiate machine tool coolant pumps (which are the kind we deal in here at Pump Sales Direct) from the coolant pumps you might find in your car, or further still, in a nuclear reactor. Although functionally similar - they all work by pumping a coolant around - there are a number of subtle differences that distinguish them from one another in practice. A coolant pump designed for a pressurised water reactor for example, is more elaborate and technical as it needs to be able to transfer heat in a steam generator to water across different pressure circuits. Meanwhile, in car engines and machine tools, the role of the coolant pump is more straightforward as they are only needed to circulate coolant irrespective of pressure differentials.

    How do I know if I need a coolant pump? And if so, what kind do I need?

    Because coolant pumps have so many industrial applications (everything from boiler feeds to industrial washing machines) it can be difficult to work out whether you actually require one, and narrowing it down to a specific model can be even tougher. However, once you have established your flow, pressure and length requirements, picking out the right coolant pump is relatively uncomplicated. On the other hand, if you are still unsure when it comes to the technical details, the flexibility of the Grundfos range of SPK coolant pumps makes them a feasible choice in a multitude of scenarios.

    At Pump Sales Direct, alongside the very popular Grundfos SPK range, we stock a variety of machine tool coolant pumps. Have a look at this extensive range of machine tool coolant pumps here.

  • The Wastewater Treatment Process

    Over time, the pressure imposed on water supplies in the UK by climate change has facilitated the construction of close to 9000 wastewater treatment plants. Slowly but surely, they are becoming an important and even ingrained part of how we as a society push back against global warming. Yet so few of us understand or are even aware of the process that transforms the wastewater that leaves our toilets, sinks and showers into potable drinking water. To provide you with a bare-bones look at the basics of the process, we have put together this summary of the role of the wastewater treatment plant.

    wilo pumps

    Screening process

    After wastewater is carried away from homes and, via a network of pipes and submersible wilo pumps, arrives at a wastewater treatment plant, it undergoes a screening process. To separate all of the biggest debris that so often accumulates, from the wastewater itself, the wastewater travels through a screen that essentially acts a sieve.  The type of screen used varies from plant to plant but the most commonly used screens include both coarse and fine screens, as well as the newer step screens.

    Primary treatment stage

    At the primary treatment stage, the mixture, newly relieved of its biggest and most easily extracted debris, is placed in a sedimentation tank. Within the settlement tanks, the heaviest material sinks to the bottom to form a layer of sludge. Large arms or scrapers then push this sludge towards the centre of the tank, where it can be disposed of or treated further, leaving a more refined fluid behind. The purpose of the primary treatment stage is to remove solids from wastewater in order to

    Secondary treatment stage

    The secondary treatment stage involves treating the wastewater to rid it of any remaining organic matter. This happens two ways - through the aeration of the wastewater and through the addition of bacteria. By pumping air into a large tank containing wastewater, bacteria are allowed to grow and thrive, where they break down any remaining nasty substances into harmless organic matter.

    Final treatment stage

    After undergoing this chemical treatment, wastewater is placed into a humus tank which separates the wastewater into its final constituents. Any remaining bacteria sinks to the bottom, forming sludge, which is then sent for secondary treatment, leaving clean water behind. Depending on which body of water the cleansed wastewater is sent to, an additional step is sometimes carried out - the remaining water can be filtered through a bed of sand to remove any resolute particles.

    Once the entire water reclamation process has been completed, the treated water can be sent to any number of different locations. The majority of treated wastewater in the UK goes back into the country’s streams and rivers and some is even discharged into the sea. Because treated water is subject to such rigorous testing by regulatory bodies, all reclaimed water bolsters the quality of water throughout the UK, not to mention availability.

  • The UK Locations Most At Risk of Flooding

    As global warming continues its march relatively unimpeded, sea levels and the incidence of tumultuous weather will continue to rise. And while many may assume that coastal regions of the UK are far and away the most susceptible to flooding, data collected by the Environment Agency actually shows that the network of rivers and tributaries that wind their way throughout Britain make inland areas just as vulnerable.

    Boston and Skegness

    It is however, a coastal region that is most in dangerous in terms of flooding. Boston and Skegness, both perched precariously on the Lincolnshire coast, are subject to frequent storm surges that plague that particular stretch of the east coast. When deep depressions track across the Atlantic Ocean (resulting in lower pressure and rising sea levels) winds push the surface waters forward as part of a process known as wind drift. When these depressions reach the North Sea, they are forced southwards. Because this water cannot escape through the Dover Strait, it accumulates in this region and causes sea levels to rise dangerously, afflicting the east coast in the process. Just earlier this month, over 3000 residents were forced to evacuate their homes in the face of warnings of gale force winds and high tides.

    Nottingham

    Nottingham is perhaps the most populous area that is perpetually under threat of sustaining damages from flooding. The city has been associated with flooding throughout its history, so much so that indentations marking the height of its historic floods have been engraved into Trent Bridge since 1852, and had been marked into the Hethbeth Bridge before it. The concern over flooding is so dire that £1 million of funds have been invested into flood defences to protect the Mapperley Park region of Nottingham. Everything from flood-resistant doors to storm gullies is under consideration.

    Vale of Clwyd

    The low-lying nature of the Vale of Clwyd puts it in jeopardy of regular flooding. The Welsh region owes this unenviable status not only to how low-lying it is, but also to its proximity to both the River Clwyd and the Irish Sea. Any time flash floods are forecast, more than 137,000 properties are at risk of being enveloped by water. The floods that devastated the region in 2012 are just one example of the area being affected by flooding.

    Windsor

    lowara pumps uk

    The River Thames continually threatens to put the residents of Windsor at risk. The 5000 residents that call the river’s banks their home have experienced severe flooding numerous times over the course of the last decade - the worst of which was the floods of 2012. The majority of residents were affected and train lines were wrought with delays and cancellations.

    If you live in an area that poses a risk of flooding, it is well worth opting to buy from lowara pumps UK. With a wide range of drainage and sump pumps available, a Lowara pump is a dependable ally for anyone who is wary of flooding affecting their home.

  • The Evolution of Irrigation

    Put simply, irrigation can be defined as the process of applying water to a crop for the purpose of aiding its growth. Thousands and thousands of years ago, the incorporation of irrigation as a mainstay of human society, also formally marked the transition of the human civilisation as a species; from one primarily composed of roaming hunter-gatherers, to the more cohesive, conventional agrarian society that is more familiar to us today. For that reason, the importance of irrigation cannot be overstated, and it retains its importance today as a cornerstone of modern society. In order to chart how irrigation has evolved and changed over the years, we have put together this whistle stop tour of the most important benchmarks in its transformation.

    qanat (1024x683) Qanat

    While archaeological evidence tentatively proves the existence of 8000 year old irrigation canals in both the Middle East and South America, the exact origins of irrigation remain murky. The first development of any significance in the world of irrigation however, is more clear-cut and first materialised around 550BC. A product of Mesopotamian ingenuity, the qanat allowed farmers to repurpose ground water for crop irrigation for the first time in history. Mesopotamians used the collective effect of a vertical well and an adjacent channel to generate a source of surface level water.

    The growing population of the 1700s propelled the rise of the European agricultural revolution. The unprecedented experimentation of the era gave birth to a host of irrigation techniques - increased experimentation with crop rotations, improved livestock breeding, the invention of seed drilling, the use of fertilisers and the introduction of new forms of machinery.

    impact sprinkler (1024x683) Impact sprinkler

    It wasn’t until 1932 though that any of the techniques we are familiar with today rose to prominence. Building on the arrival of the domestic lawn sprinkler thirty years earlier, the invention of the impact sprinkler became the building block upon which modern irrigation was founded. As the impact sprinkler became more and more popular, it ushered in a new era of automated watering. American farmers had hitherto been reliant on gravity to carry water along the antiquated furrows that supplied rows upon rows of crops with nourishment.

    The next major development in agricultural irrigation came in the late 1960s with the introduction of drip irrigation. Not only did it do a better job of increasing crop productivity than any technique that preceded it, it also did so using a far lower amount of water. And thus, the practice of micro irrigation was born. Characterised by small fixtures that are capable of administering water with unerring accuracy, micro irrigation has since become a mainstay of agricultural irrigation.

    jabsco pumps Jabsco self priming pump

    As you’d expect, irrigation systems have become infinitely more complex as time has passed. The pressurised systems that power both of the most popular administration methods - sprinkler and drip irrigation - are always composed of a water source, a pump to pressurise the water, a network of pipes that distribute the water from the pump, as well as the sprinklers or emitters themselves. The centrepiece of these systems is the pump, and without one of sufficient quality, any crops are unlikely to flourish. Jabsco pumps provide a range of versatile pumps that can adapt to often tricky pressurised irrigation systems.

  • An Introduction to Agricultural Irrigation

    For the unfamiliar, agricultural irrigation is the manual application of water to land for the purpose of growing and sustaining crops. What sounds like a simple process is actually bewilderingly complex at times. With climate and crops differing by region, a variety of irrigation techniques have emerged, which, while useful, also serves to complicate matters further. To help you sift through the confusing world of irrigation, we have produced this guide to the most popular, effective and efficient techniques.

    Flood irrigation

    flood irrigation

    Flood irrigation is the oldest and most inefficient form of agricultural irrigation. As its name suggests, flood irrigation essentially consists of allowing water to flow freely through a field of crops. Its haphazard application makes it an attractive choice for farmers that are reluctant to splash out on a complicated (and sometimes expensive) delivery system of pipes and pumps, but it also makes it extremely inefficient. Over half of the water intended to nourish crops is actually lost to evaporation, run-off, transpiration and infiltration of unintended areas, making flood irrigation a poor choice for those who are environmentally conscious.

    Pressurised irrigation

    Unlike flood irrigation, which can occur almost without human intervention, drip and flood irrigation is reliant on an elaborate system that provides them with a supply of pressurised water. Composed of a water source, a pump that is capable of pressurising the water, as well as a means of actually transferring water to the crops; pressurised irrigation systems are far more complex than their flood irrigation counterparts. This complexity allows pressurised systems to be far more efficient and effective, but it also makes them far more likely to break down.

    Drip irrigation

    self priming pump

    Drip irrigation is, by some distance, the most efficient form of agricultural irrigation, but it is also one of the most difficult to maintain. A network of pipes, interwoven with emitters at strategic locations, allow water to be dropped directly onto the root zone of crops with unerring accuracy, so much so, that it can result in a 95% distribution uniformity, which, for the unaware, is a measure of how evenly water soaks into the ground during irrigation.

    Sprinkler irrigation

    Sprinkler irrigation works in much the same way as drip irrigation does, just in a slightly less efficient manner. Water travels from the source, becomes pressurised thanks to a self-priming pump, and is then distributed across crop fields by a selection of sprinklers. If the sprinklers are positioned optimally, and water is applied in a uniform fashion, sprinkler irrigation can be relatively efficient. What makes sprinkler irrigation less efficient than its pressurised cousin drip irrigation, is that it can be thwarted by adverse weather conditions - even a simple breeze can drastically affect the trajectory of water from sprinklers.

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