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central heating pumps

  • Four things to prioritise when designing your new bathroom

    Planning the design of a new bathroom can be a daunting task. You want to make sure every single penny of your investment is well spent. To ensure you don’t focus your attention in the wrong places (and spend an inordinate amount of time worrying about things that you shouldn’t be) we’ve created this post that delves into the four things you should prioritise when planning your new bathroom.

    High performance

    Ultimately, your bathroom serves a purpose. The toilet, shower (maybe even a bath) and sink all need to function properly. These are all things that the people in your house use every single day. If they don’t work well, it can be incredibly frustrating. Perhaps more infuriating than anything else is a shower with weak water pressure. As annoying as it can be, thankfully, there is a simple solution: installing a shower pump. Quality shower pumps can bolster water pressure and give your home the high pressure shower everyone craves.

    Efficiency/ water-saving

    After ensuring that everything in your bathroom works adequately, you then need to see what you can do to make sure everything runs efficiently. If you have a water meter installed in your home, you have a strong financial incentive to ensure that all your bathroom fixtures use water efficiently. One way you can do this is to fit aerating shower heads and taps. Another way you can do it is to install central heating pumps that autonomously find the most efficient way to heat and distribute water around your home.

    Maximising space

    Tucked away in the corner of the house, or hidden away under the stairs, bathrooms can often be quite confined spaces. Getting the most out of this space requires careful planning and an ability to find space-saving solutions. Part of this is furnishing your bathroom with pieces that are perfectly suited to the space. Fitting a corner basin is an especially savvy way to maximise the amount of room you have. Mounting the towel bar on the back of a door and opting for a shower curtain instead of a sliding glass door are similarly effective moves.

    Appearance

    The appearance of your bathroom is always going to be a priority. Tempering your aesthetic vision with practical consideration is an inevitability but striking a delicate balance between the two is possible to accomplish. Tiles are a good example. Sleek and refined, they are also water resistant - making them more than capable of withstanding splashes of water the sink and shower. 2019 has ushered in a couple of important bathroom trends. Neutral and understated, grey bathrooms have become extremely popular. So too, have rose gold fixtures. If you want to be on top of the latest trends – and these ideas sound appealing to you – consider incorporating them into your bathroom design.

     

  • Innovative Ways to Keep Your Home Warm this Winter

    With the days getting shorter and the nights getting longer, more and more of us are reaching for that extra blanket or hot water bottle in a desperate attempt to cut back on our energy bills. More often than not though, these attempts are in vain. But what if I told you there are a number of simple and cost-effective ways you can keep your home a few degrees warmer without breaking the bank?

    Grundfos Magna 32

    DIY draught excluders

    In the modern age, it is easy to obsess over increasingly intricate and complex technologies and how they can make our lives better - and the same certainly applies to heating. But sometimes we are better off looking to the past and the use of draught excluders is one such example. Designed to prevent heat escaping from beneath your door, draught excluders are a necessity for a pleasantly warm home. If you are feeling particularly money savvy, you can easily create one of your own using nothing more than an old pair of tights and a few socks.

    Imitating double glazing

    You don’t need to shell out on double glazing to reap the rewards of it. In spite of its garish appearance, bubble wrap is a surprisingly effective alternative to double glazing. Thanks to its insulating properties, it is a more than worthy mimic. By coating your windows with bubble wrap, you can keep your home considerably warmer. Because of its appearance though, it certainly isn’t going to appeal to everyone. There is another option for the more aesthetically conscious - a transparent film.

    Capturing sunlight during the day and keeping it trapped at night

    If you aren’t going to rely on conventional heating methods during the winter months, you have to make the most of what little sunlight is available to you. The most effective - and simplest - way to do this is to open your curtains during the day and close them during the night. Any sunlight that filters into your home during the day will have a warming effect and closing your curtains or blinds when the sun goes in will ensure as much of the heat is retained as possible.

    Installing the right heating pump

    As much as you can maximise the temperature of your home using a variety of DIY methods, there is no substitute for a quality heating pump. The Grundfos Magna 32 is a stellar example. As an ‘A’ rated circulator, it is widely recognised as one of the best on the market today - and it owes this status to its efficiency. It uses up to 80% less energy than a ‘D’ rated circulator, culminating in an annual saving for the average household of around 10% on electricity. Whilst saving both energy and money, the Magna 32 will ensure that you have hot water whenever you need it - whether that be to run a hot bath or to switch on a radiator.

  • How to Fight Back Against Food Waste

    As a society we’ve grown disturbingly accustomed to wasting resources and destroying our fragile planet. Hundreds of trillions of gallons of water are wasted globally in food production alone, an unfathomable number to the average person. And yet the water we use to drink, bathe in, shower in, and flush the toilet with, accounts for less than one per cent of the world’s overall supply. In a century where the global population is expected to surpass nine billion, it’s never been more critical to manage our use of resources and limit waste.

    We’re all guilty of wasting food but not all of us are aware of the dire impact this is having on the environment. Landfills of rotting, wasted food are potent sources of methane - a greenhouse gas with the potential to accelerate climate change even faster than carbon dioxide. A reduction in food wastage would also mean a reduction in the emission of greenhouse gases in general, as the environment-harming chemicals associated with the production of food will be lessened.

    So what can we do to reduce food waste?

    Planning meals in advance

    Shopping list

    Efficiency and management is the key. At the supermarket, try to shop with a list, reducing impulsive purchases. A weekly planning schedule could help, giving you an idea of what to prepare and when. In time, you’ll develop a knack for portion sizes, and will learn what’s right for you and others, you may even find you’ve overspent in the past, making your weekly shop more cost effective.

    Getting creative with leftovers

    pickled goods

    As much as proper planning can help, leftovers are unfortunately more or less an inevitability. Freezing anything that is left over can preserve it for months. Canning, pickling and drying are three effective ways of ensuring your food goes further. The Love Food Hate Waste website is an invaluable resource - it is full of unorthodox, underrated and underappreciated cooking techniques and recipes that can help you create something delicious from what you would otherwise assume are incompatible ingredients.

    Invest in a wilo central heating pump

    wilo central heating pump

    While it won’t technically reduce the amount of food waste you generate, a wilo central heating pump will help to reduce the guilt you’ll feel after hearing the following statistic: throwing away a single burger wastes the same amount of water as running a shower for an hour and-a-half. Whenever food is wasted, so too is a mass of water.

    These ingenious central heating circulator units from Wilo regulate and maintain the water temperature in pipes even if they aren’t located near the storage tank or boiler. Although some initial energy is expended maintaining a uniform temperature, in the long term you can expect a drastic reduction in both consumption and wastage. After all, there’s no need heat up the water if it’s already at a desirable temperature, and you’ll no longer have to let the water ‘run’ as you turn on the tap - because it’ll already be hot.

  • Six things to keep in mind when designing a bathroom

    Designing a new bathroom can be a real headache. More often than not, bathrooms are already one of the smaller sized rooms in the house. When you add showers, sinks and toilets to it, it can make planning your new bathroom very tricky indeed. Juggling these space constraints whilst simultaneously worrying about functionality, visual appeal and durability, can lead to a muddled approach, and a disappointing, sub-par bathroom. To walk you through this process, and point out what you should be prioritising, we have put together this quick guide to designing a new bathroom.

    Functionality

    grundfos pumps uk

    At the end of the day, a bathroom’s functionality is of utmost importance. If your shower doesn’t work and your toilet doesn’t flush, you’re going to run into some problems. With this in mind, you want to be certain that all of your appliances, regardless of appearance, will function the way you need them to. And Grundfos pumps UK are a manufacturer you can rely on. From home booster units that can resolve low water levels to central heating circulators that can single-handedly improve efficiency across an entire system;  Grundfos can help you sculpt a superbly functioning bathroom.

    Durability

    bathroom tiles

    When you are investing money into anything, one of the very first questions you should ask is: how long is it going to last? And this ethos is definitely applicable to bathrooms. While wallpaper might be an attractive short term investment, it is exactly that - short-term - it might be visually appealing, but it won’t last a fraction of the time that tiles will. Tiles are far better suited to tolerate splashes of water and clouds of steam, offering you superior value for money.

    Visual appeal

    brass bathroom

    Your primary concern should always be quality, but that does not mean you need to scrimp on the visual aspect of your bathroom. Brass fittings have experienced a resurgence as of late, mostly because of its warm tones that help to distinguish it from the  cold and clinical looking, albeit popular, chrome and nickel. A distinctive vanity cabinet can have a similarly drastic effect. By acting as the focal point of the bathroom, it can add a healthy amount of character. It is however, vitally important to consider how your own financial and space restrictions can dictate your ability to outfit your bathroom in the exact way you want it to.

    Space

    best floating vanity

    One way of circumventing a space issue is to choose a floating vanity cabinet. Its ability to float far from voids the traditionally elegant nature of the vanity cabinet, and creates space that otherwise would not exist. As well as providing additional storage space, the floating vanity cabinet, more importantly, creates the perception of a larger bathroom. Equally deceptive but effective are large mirrors and glass panels, both of which are adept at creating the illusion of a bigger bathroom.

  • Surviving and thriving in the coldest places on the planet

    I’m sure you would be inclined to argue otherwise, but, despite what you’ve probably been led to believe by sensationalist headlines, the UK isn’t actually the coldest place on earth. In an average year, the temperature doesn’t even drop below zero. The inhabitants of Oymyakon and Verkhoyansk meanwhile, have the unique pleasure of living in the two places considered the coldest in the world. But the cold isn’t even the most interesting thing about these places, it is how the people that live there have adapted their lifestyle to not only survive, but thrive.

    Oymyakon, Russia

    central heating pumps

    You can understand why just 500 people are brave enough to make Oymyakon, the coldest inhabited place on Earth, their home. During the winter months, the temperature hovers around the -50°C mark and a measly four hours of sunlight puncture the semi-constant cloak of darkness each day. With such an inhospitable climate, how do residents possibly cope?

    The icy conditions prevent the growth of produce, and for that reason, the local diet is overwhelmingly reliant on meat. An average day can consist of raw fish, horse liver and rabbit soup. In keeping with the mantra that alcohol can warm you up; there is regular consumption of vodka, or as the locals call it Russki chai, which translates as the more docile-sounding Russian tea.

    Layers upon layers of animal fur are considered the only worthwhile defence against the biting cold. And this even extends to footwear - the most popular of which are constructed from reindeer leg fur. So adapted and used to the freezing conditions are the people of Oymyakon, that the only time schools are forced to close, is when the temperature dips below -55°C.

    Verkhoyansk, Russia

    central heating pumps

    Oymyakon’s closest rival for the king of cold is also close by geographically - relatively speaking anyway. At less than 1 person per square mile, the Sakha Republic has an extremely low population density, making the 400 miles that separate Oymyakon and Verkhoyansk seem reasonably  tame. Even though Verkhoyansk has close to three times as many inhabitants as Oymyakon, it is far from an indication that their climate is three times as accommodating.

    Verkhoyansk describes itself as the Pole of Cold and claims it has recorded the lowest ever temperature in an inhabited place. Do the daily lives of Verkhoyansk’s residents differ much from their neighbours in Oymyakon? In short, no. Pony innards are considered a delicacy and copious layers of fur clothing are an absolute prerequisite for braving the elements. They even share their neighbours’ penchant for vodka.

    Both are decidedly isolated but Verkhoyansk even more so - there are strictly-speaking, no roads leading to the town, and it is only accessible in the colder months when all of the lakes that surround it are frozen over - making for a treacherous trip. For this reason, heating is that bit more difficult. As is the case in Oymyakon, the residents of Verkhoyansk rely on wood burners, and some coal, to provide them with warmth. But because of their severity of their isolation, over a third of their income is spent purely on heating, with approximately seven truckloads of wood needed to keep a single home warm over the winter months.

    King of Cold? Oymyakon or Verkhoyansk?

    central heating pumps

    You would think their shared way of life would give them a certain sense of kinship and put them on the same page. But when it comes to the contentious issue of whose home is coldest, Verkhoyansk and Oymyakon couldn’t be more divided. Both have monuments proclaiming their status as the pole of cold. As well as the faux-mammoth head declaring just that, Verkhoyansk has a commemorative black marble plaque marking a record reading of -67.6°C, whilst Oymyakon has a distinctly Communist-style monument stating a record temperature of -67.7°C. The miniscule 0.1°C difference leaves just enough doubt to render the result inconclusive and the debate unwinnable.

    Regardless, just reading about temperatures that cold should send a shiver down your spine. Central heating pumps can ensure that your own home is warm whenever you need it to be.

  • Is infrared heating here to stay?

    Infrared heating has struggled to find its market - that is, until late last year. Having been all but dismissed as a viable alternative to LPG (Liquid Petroleum Gas) infrared heating has since pivoted to great success. Infrared saunas are the latest craze gripping the famously fickle attention of the health industry - but is it just another fad that will stick around for a matter of months before exiting as unceremoniously as it entered, or is it built to last long-term?

    The history of infrared heaters  

    It wasn’t for another 150 years after the discovery of infra-red radiation that it was properly adapted for the purpose of heating. During World War Two, infrared heating started to prosper more. Banks and banks of infrared lamps were constructed to dry paints and lacquers on military equipment. After the war ended, infrared heating failed to go from strength-to-strength, with its use floundering rather than flourishing.

    Fit for use in the home?

    grundfos alpha

    Infra-red heating models itself as an alternative to the gas heaters that have a stranglehold on the heating market. Better for the environment and better for your bank balance apparently. Whilst the former can be true (if the source of electricity is renewable in origin) the latter certainly isn’t. At 14p per kWh (kilowatt hour) infrared heating is the most expensive heating fuel available. And it is perhaps for this reason that infrared heating has failed to cut into LPG’s sizeable market share in domestic heating - especially as LPG costs a meagre 6p per kWh. With tech like the Grundfos selectric ensuring maximum efficiency, the price battle between LPG and infrared becomes a complete mismatch.

    The revival of infrared heating?

    Infrared heating has experienced a resurgence as of late, mostly thanks to the infrared sauna and the growing roster of famous clientele that swear by its effects. Unlike many other health fads that fail to expand beyond the trend-setting hub of Los Angeles, infrared saunas have successfully breached the proverbial ceiling - and for that reason, they look set to stay -at least for a while anyway.

    What are infrared saunas?

    grundfos alpha

    As you can probably guess from the name, an infrared sauna replaces the heat that is typically generated through traditional means (hot rocks and water or something of that ilk) with radiant heat from infrared light. Because the infrared rays heat the body directly, rather than the surrounding air, a lower temperature of around 70°C (normal sauna temperature is around 90°C) is required to achieve the same cardiovascular exertion.

    Does the science back up the reported effects?

    What infrared saunas haven’t escaped is the absolute scarcity of scientific evidence backing their extensive list of miraculous effects. Improvements in cardiovascular health, weight loss, detoxification, and even euphoria are just a few of many supposed benefits.  The cardiovascular benefits are well-documented, but the rest, not so much. The weight loss claim is dubious at best - water weight is lost through sweat but is quickly replaced when rehydration takes place. As for the detoxifying effect, there is no evidence that any heavy metals or radiation are wiped from your body as many ‘experts’ have claimed. The purpose of sweat is to cool your body, not to expel toxins.

    In spite of the controversy, infrared saunas are enjoying a period of popularity at the moment and the future of infrared heating seems to rest firmly in the niche of saunas, rather than central heating.

  • How pumps are being used to save lives

    Water for Life - shower pumpsBy definition, a pump is a device that moves fluids by mechanical action. The form which this mechanism takes is becoming more and more diverse. We are all familiar with central heating pumps and shower pumps, but pumps are increasingly being used to save lives across the globe, thanks to the latest technology. From people suffering from heart problems in the UK, to those struggling with respiratory problems in Malawi, pumps have been able to grant them all a new lease of life.

    Preventing death from waterborne diseases

    In many areas across the world, people do not have access to clean, safe drinking water. Often dependent on a single body of water, residents often have no choice but to consume contaminated water plagued with disease. Inevitably, this leads to countless deaths from diarrhoea, dysentery, typhoid and cholera.

    That is why it is so important that wells are built to provide safe drinking water. Fresh water can be transported up to ground level from hundreds of feet below using submersible pumps, providing residents with water they can consume without risking death.

    Saving those that are too ill to undergo a heart transplant

    A research programme headed by world renowned heart surgeon, Sir Magdi Yacoub, has made huge strides towards saving the lives of those who would otherwise die waiting for heart transplants from cardiomyopathy. Instead, a 3 by 5 inch pump is implanted into the abdomen and attached to the left ventricle. Deputising for the failing left ventricle, the HeartMate 2 allows the heart to continue to pump fresh blood around the body.

    While the heart is bolstered by the pump, the patient is given high doses of heart failure drugs that the diseased heart would not otherwise be able to cope with. Many patients, who were so ill that they were taken off the heart transplant list, were able to make a full recovery thanks to this pump without even having to undergo a transplant.

    Innovations that are saving people in the developing world

    In the developing world, conventional medical technology is invariably too expensive to procure. Fortunately, researchers at world leading universities like Rice and MIT have created viable, cost-effective alternatives for those in developing countries in desperate need of medical assistance.

    Bicycle pump nebuliser

    One such example is the spawn of MIT’s Innovations in International Health; a nebuliser constructed using a bicycle pump. For the unfamiliar, a nebuliser provides emergency relief for patients suffering from respiratory diseases. The bicycle pump replaces the air compressor of the nebuliser, and allows it to run in the absence of electricity, making it a more cost-effective and versatile replacement.

    Fish tank pump CPOP machine

    Another example of innovation at its finest is the fish tank pump that is being used to ensure the survival of premature new-borns in developing countries. Researchers at Rice University have created a functioning Continuous Positive Airway Pressure machine for a tenth of the price - using only a box and a fish tank pump. Trialled in Malawi, the device had an immediate impact, the survival rate of premature babies jumped from 43% to 71%.

  • How to lower your heating bill in 2017

    Lower bills with Grundfos central heating pumpWinter is an expensive time for everyone. Not only are our bank accounts depleted with the December Christmas frenzy, our bank accounts take an additional hit in the way of energy bills. Heating your home is a necessity, but it doesn’t always have to be an expensive one. Here at Pump Sales Direct we have compiled a list of some tips to help you keep those heating bills in check.

    1. Be selective with which rooms you heat

    Just because you decide to have the heating on doesn’t mean every room in the house has to be warm. If you have a spare bedroom or any room that you simply don’t use, turn the radiator off in there.

    2. Insulate your home properly

    You would be surprised at the amount of heat that you may be losing through the walls of your home. It’s a fact that over 60% of your home’s heat can be lost if not insulated. It may seem like a lot of money to spend, but think about how much you’ll be saving in the long run.

    3. Get yourself a Grundfos central heating pump

    Central heating pumps are vital in preventing wastage of hot water within your home. The Grundfos central heating pump range we offer are the most advanced and energy efficient circulators on the market. They have variable and fixed speed operation, incorporated power display units and ‘A’ energy rating (the lowest consumption rating and low noise operation). If you already have one, it maybe time to replace your pump.

    5. Adjust your thermostat to suit the weather

    Shaving a few degrees off your thermostat on particularly warm days can make a significant difference in saving wasted energy. If the day turns out to be warmer than expected, turn it down, or even better: turn it off. Find out how you can control your heating from your iPhone.

    5. Invest in a humidifier

    While it might sound like a bizarre tip, but adding moisture to the air creates humidity which feels warmer and can actually keep the heat in better. Another way to add humidity to your home is through decorating your house with plants, they’re not just for show!

    6. Don’t overuse your exhaust fans

    While they can be great for clearing steam when cooking or showering, if you leave an exhaust fan on for too long it will suck the warm air out of the room. Make sure you use it sparingly and turn it off when you’re finished.

    7. Utilise your blankets & clothing

    Sometimes wrapping up warm can be a fantastic (and much cheaper) alternative to reaching for the thermostat. Wearing your jumpers indoors in the daytime and throwing additional blankets on your bed at night can keep you warm and toasty.

    8. Make use of the sun

    Natures natural source of heating, be sure to keep your curtains open in the daytime to let the heat in; especially in the south side of the house where you are more likely to get direct sunlight. Remember to close the curtains at sundown so you can trap the heat within your home.

    Try our 1-hour home energy audit that can save you money.

     

  • The basic central heating terms you need to know

    Central heating makes a huge difference to how comfortable our homes are in winter. However, installing a central heating system can be quite a large undertaking, especially for those new to the world of boilers and central heating pumps. Here is a rundown of the basic terms that are used when discussing central heating.

    central heating pump

     

    Boiler types

    Combi (or combination) boiler is one of the most used terms in the world of central heating, as this type of boiler is very popular in the UK. The combi boiler will take care of your general hot water needs and the central heating from one piece of equipment. One of the reasons for the popularity of the combi boiler is its ability to provide hot water almost immediately.

    Another type of boiler is the high-pressure system (unvented), which has a separate cylinder for hot water. Then there is also the gravity-fed boiler, which will have a separate cylinder for hot water.

    The condensing boiler is often hailed as more efficient and a way to save money on fuel, but it will probably require a condensate pump and a drainage pipe.

    Domestic hot water

    Also known as DHW, this indicates what part of the boiler system is being discussed. The hot water is one part of the system, and the central heating is the other. With a combi boiler, the hot water is produced inside the unit. With other types of boiler, the hot water is contained in a storage cylinder.

    Bar pressure

    This is an important part of the combi boiler system. A gauge measures the pressure in the combi boiler's sealed circuit, which requires a certain level of bar pressure to work.

    Flow rate

    This is a measure of the combi boiler's performance. It quantifies the delivery of hot water - that is the amount of hot water flowing to a tap from a boiler.

    Flue pipe

    This is an essential part of the boiler. It carries boiler emissions to the exterior of your property and safely discharges them outside.

    Central heating pump

    This is a pump that moves water around within your central heating system. The central heating pump forces hot water to make the journey from your boiler through the radiators and back to the boiler again. When water leaves your boiler, it is at a high temperature. As it moves through the system, the water will cool down, and the latent heat that is transferred into the air heats the room. When the water is pumped back to the boiler, then the process begins again.

    Condensing boiler

    This is a type of boiler that condenses water vapour in the boiler's exhaust to recover some of the energy already used and thus achieve greater fuel efficiency.

    Condensate pipe

    This allows by-products of the boiler, such as alkaline water or condensate, to be conducted into a drain. As it is a conduit to the exterior, it is possible that this pipe can freeze in winter, and so adequate insulation must be installed to prevent this happening.

    If you are thinking about installing a central heating system, the best idea is to consult boiler experts such as our team at Pump Sales Direct. We can help you ascertain what hot water and heating system best suits your household and what will fulfil your needs.

  • How to look after your central heating this summer

    With the days getting longer and the weather getting warmer, people tend to forget their heating in the summer, but with only the need for hot water, it’s undoubtedly the best time for servicing and repairs to boilers, radiators and your central heating pumps.

    central heating pumps

    Standard Boilers

    Conventional boilers don’t have a summer mode. Some have an immersion heater attached to the cylinder so that you can heat the water with the boiler off, but it’s not particularly efficient and quite an expensive drain on electricity.

     

    The heating and hot water aren’t independent, so the boiler will still come on when hot water is needed. A cylinder thermostat and valves control the hot water, so these are things you should consider checking.

     

    Up in the loft, you’ll find the cold water storage and expansion tanks. Summer is a great time to check these as well. Check the overflow, and make sure the ball valves are shutting off correctly. If they’re not already insulated, cover and lag your tanks. This will decrease the time it takes to reheat the water in your cylinder.

     

    Central Heating Pump

    It is advisable to check your central heating pump as well, although you will need to ensure your heating is on for this. Make sure the radiators warm up thoroughly as expected and that the pump isn’t making any grinding or rattling noises. Other common central heating problems explained here.

     

    Combination Boilers

    Unlike conventional boilers, many combination boilers have a summer setting which provides hot water only. Combi boilers don’t store the water, either, which is great on the pocket as you’re only heating what you need.

     

    It’s advisable to clean your system once a year. Flush it through with industry cleanser, and when filling it back up, add in an inhibitor to prevent the metal in your system from rusting.

    Equally, if removing or replacing radiators, make sure you re-dose the system with inhibitor to avoid leaking radiators and corrosion.

     

    As the cold water is effectively warmer in the summer, it may also be a good idea to adjust the hot water temperature setting. This will give a better blend of cold and hot water. This may also work for showers - a slightly cooler shower may be more preferable in the summer.

     

    Radiators

    With new designs of radiators being introduced over the past few years, many people are looking to upgrade in order to improve the look of their home. Summer is undoubtedly a great time for replacing radiators and for essential radiator maintenance.

     

    Room thermostats and thermostatic valves make the running of your heating system more efficient, so the summer months are a great time to get these fitted. You won’t regret it in the winter when you’re saving money on your heating bills.

     

    Always make sure to drain the system of any air introduced by maintenance, repairs or replacements and to make up for the water you have lost. Be sure to add a small amount of inhibitor too.

     

    Doing the work in the summer not only prepares you for the coming winter months, but also means you’re less likely to go without central heating when you need it the most. See our full  range of central heating pumps.

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